Category Archives for "RV Living"

Adapting To Covid19 Restrictions

RV Security and Safety Badge.

The COVID19 Crisis is constantly evolving not just day by day, but now hour by hour as we have found out firsthand.

Living the RVing Lifestyle requires the ability to adapt. There are influences outside of your control that will impact your decisions and many of us are finding out that even this pandemic known as Covid19 is just such an influencer in our day to day decisions.

We were supposed to move to a different RV resort in a different city not too far from where we are currently staying. We have a reservation, but we have been weighing the pros and cons of relocating. With the social distancing and self-isolation, going from a rural venue to one inside a major city, the risk of exposure increases. Not that folks in the RV resort won’t be respectful of each other’s space, it’s a matter of density of the population.

More people in stores while shopping for necessities, increases one’s chance of accidental contact with someone who is a carrier who doesn’t display symptoms. Our decision involves looking at our budget, staying put will cost us more out of pocket but we feel that it is cheaper than getting infected and the physical costs associated with the virus.

Reports of parks, including the one we are currently at have now said “NOT ACCEPTING NEW ARRIVALS.”  For those heading here, it will be an unexpected surprise upon their arrival. Hopefully, you if you are traveling today or are planning to travel in the coming days you wisely call ahead to make sure that your destination is open and accepting arrivals.

For us, we’ve enjoyed our time where we are and had wished we could have stayed longer…which as it turns out we will be. Hunkering down for us is easy as we work from our RV and have plenty to keep us busy. To break up the day, there are plenty of regular RV maintenance and projects to attend to. Given that we are in the desert southwest…walks in the desert offer plenty of sunshine and exercise which helps keep the body and mind sound while still practicing social distancing.

The drawback with our decision is we were forced to choose to either extend only for one more night or a month as those are the only two options given. We chose the month and will have to adjust our planned stays going forward. They are doing what they can to ensure folks stay put and self-isolate until this crisis is adverted. This is now becoming a common practice with parks we are learning…so call ahead and expect the unexpected. Don’t stress over what you can’t control and enjoy the journey even if it is temporarily interupted. Stay healthy and safe!

 

 

Got Mice?

A mouse climbs a rope -how to keep mice out of an RV.

It is not uncommon for RVers to find that their rig has been invaded by unwanted four-legged guests … mice. That’s never any fun, so today’s post deals with how to keep mice out of an RV.

Rodents, in general, are attracted to the RVing lifestyle for much the same reasons you are. An RV is a cozy place with all of the comforts and amenities … mostly food.

Do You Glove Up?

As an RVer, we are tasked to connect to a sewer connection at our site or pay a visit to the nearest dump station to empty our gray and black tanks. There are those who choose to glove up, that is putting on gloves to keep their hands clean and poo free. Are you someone who does? Have you really thought about why you do and what you touch in the process of dumping? Not many really do and if they had someone video them from a distance and played back the video, they’d be surprised at what they actually did do.

A Back Flow Preventer Has Limitations

Ever notice that brass device secured to the faucet at your campsite? It is a Back-Flow Preventer.  This is a required item in many states, counties and municipalities to meet health and safety codes.

What is a Back Flow Preventer?

A Back-Flow Preventer, much like a Check Valve, only only allows fluids to flow in one direction. The difference between the two is that a Back-Flow Preventer has built in vents to release the liquid under pressure once the faucet is shut off or it loses pressure. A Check Valve has no such means to release built up pressure. This makes disconnecting a hose that is under pressure difficult and potentially give you a baptism when disconnecting.

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